FBHP title
  • header-photo2
  • watergdns_opt_opt
  • p1040464_opt
  • p1030415_opt
  • dsc_9770_opt
  • p11506393_opt
  • p1040415_opt
FBHP logo

Chair’s Welcome

I am delighted as Chair of the Friends to welcome you to our website. Bushy Park and Home Park are two wonderful large green oases in the south west corner of London. Feeling wild, they are natural places with ancient histories, fascinating heritage and superb wildlife. Both are Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) containing rare species. These are places to be enjoyed and conserved. Which is why the Friends exist, campaigning, supporting and protecting the parks, and enhancing visitors’ enjoyment with information, advice and guidance.

We are always pleased to receive feedback. You can contact us by clicking here.

Keep Up-to-date

Members and non-members can receive emails about events in the parks. To subscribe, please enter your email address below.


Plastic has no place in the Park

Plastic has no place in the Park

Mangled tennis ball, potentially lethal to a deer

Deer will eat anything and litter kills about five deer a year.

Anyone who thinks deer only eat grass should think again. Last week’s Richmond and Twickenham Times (4.2.11) included an article about the deer in Richmond Park and how investigations into unexplained deaths revealed they had eaten dog poo bags, bits of plastic, string and even rope.

As a regular visitor to Bushy Park, I come across rotting tennis balls, broken plastic dogs’ toys, bits of foam rubber, poo bags and hairbands on a daily basis. My dog has been seriously ill, as have many other dogs after chewing and eating such objects and I know one dog died.

I am well aware of the enjoyment many dogs get from fetching balls and frisbies but it’s clear that many of these objects end up lost in the bracken. I appeal to park visitors to make every effort to take their possessions home with them and dispose of poo bags and litter in the plentiful bins supplied. If you come across a discarded tennis ball or another item that could pose a danger to animals, please be a good citizen and take it to a bin and encourage children to do so too.

We are privileged to be able to walk amongst free roaming deer in these beautiful parks and in return, we should respect and do all we can to protect their habitat and encourage future generations to do so too.

Julie Hill, FBHP, February 2011.

Walks & Talks

Forthcoming event

Thursday, 23rd Nov 8:00 pm

The Royal Parks in the Great War. Talk by David Ivison

Latest report

A perimeter walk of Home Park led by Nicholas Garbutt was enjoyed by over 45 people on 2nd September.Walk in Home Park- 2nd September

Full report...