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Chair’s Welcome

I am delighted as Chair of the Friends to welcome you to our website. Bushy Park and Home Park are two wonderful large green oases in the south west corner of London. Feeling wild, they are natural places with ancient histories, fascinating heritage and superb wildlife. Both are Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) containing rare species. These are places to be enjoyed and conserved. Which is why the Friends exist, campaigning, supporting and protecting the parks, and enhancing visitors’ enjoyment with information, advice and guidance.

We are always pleased to receive feedback. You can contact us by clicking here.

Keep Up-to-date

Members and non-members can receive emails about events in the parks. To subscribe, please enter your email address below.

Latest news

  • Ham House and Garden (talk report)

    Naomi Campbell, who has worked for the National Trust in a range of roles for the past 17 years and now manages a group of properties including Ham House and Garden, and Petersham Meadows, gave us an insightful talk on 22 October about current projects at Ham.

  • Planting in the Woodland Gardens

    Planting in the Woodland Gardens

    Despite the wet and windy weather on Saturday a gallant group of volunteers planted 200 yews and hollies in the Bog Garden.

  • Request for a new auditor

    The Trustees are seeking a replacement for Carol Ruddock, who audited the Friends’ annual accounts for several years and stepped down at the 2015 AGM. Is anyone interested in taking on this voluntary job?

  • Joint statement from The Royal Parks and The Royal Parks Foundation

    The Royal Parks and the charity The Royal Parks Foundation have agreed they should become a new single organisation to fundraise for and manage the capital’s eight Royal Parks.

  • Autumn Fruits

    This is the season of autumn fruits – conkers, chestnuts, fungi and so on. Fungi are also part of the ecosystem; beetles, flies and fungus gnats all lay eggs in fungi; squirrels, deer, slugs and snails all eat fungi. Conkers and chestnuts form an essential part of the deer’s diet, without which they would not be able to build up fat reserves needed for the cold winter months.

    Removal of autumn fruits and seeds is illegal and detrimental to the Park’s wildlife. If you see someone picking fungi, please call 101 the non-emergency police number and report the theft.

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Why we need more Friends

With more members our voice is stronger when we campaign to protect the Parks, and with more subscription income we can do more to provide information and education about the Parks, their wildlife and their history.

Join us today!

Walks & Talks

Forthcoming event

Thursday, 25th Oct 8:00 pm

TALK by Kate Canning, “Friends to nature – the wonder of bees”

Latest report

The Friends enjoyed a fascinating walk and talk led by arboriculturalist Gillian Jonasus.

Full report...

Information Point

The Information Point next to the Pheasantry Welcome Centre café is where our volunteers help visitors find out more about the parks and where visitors can purchase souvenirs of your visit to support our work.

Click this panel to visit our Information Point section and also to find out how you can get involved as a volunteer.